Joint Replacement Surgery

Hip joint and knee joint replacements are helping people of all ages live pain- free, active lives.

Joints are formed by the ends of two or more bones connected by tissue called cartilage. Healthy cartilage serves as a protective cushion, allowing smooth, low-friction movement of the joint. If the cartilage becomes damaged by disease or injury, the tissues around the joint become inflamed, causing pain. With time, the cartilage wears away, allowing the rough edges of bone to rub against each other, causing more pain.

When only some of the joint is damaged, a surgeon may be able to repair or replace just the damaged parts. When the entire joint is damaged, a total joint replacement is done. To replace a total knee joint, a surgeon removes the diseased or damaged parts and inserts artificial parts, called prostheses or implants.

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Knee

Total Knee Replacement

Total Knee Replacement

The knee is made up of the femur (thighbone), the tibia (shinbone), and patella (kneecap). The meniscus, the soft cartilage between the femur and tibia, serves as a cushion and helps absorb shock during motion. Arthritis (inflammation of the joints), injury, or other diseases of the joint can damage this protective layer of cartilage, causing extreme pain and difficulty in performing daily activities.

Unicompartmental Knee Replacement

Uni condylar Knee Replacement

Unicompartmental knee replacement is a minimally invasive surgery in which only the damaged compartment of the knee is replaced with an implant. It is also called a partial knee replacement. The knee can be divided into three compartments: patellofemoral, the compartment in front of the knee between the knee cap and thigh bone, medial compartment, on the inside portion of the knee, and lateral compartment which is the area on the outside portion of the knee joint.

Revision Knee Replacement

Revision Knee Replacement

Revision knee replacement surgery involves replacing part or all your previous knee prosthesis with a new prosthesis. Although total knee replacement surgery is successful, sometimes the procedure can fail due to various reasons and require a second revision surgery.

Patellofemoral Knee Replacement

Patellofemoral Knee Replacement

Traditionally, a patient with only one compartment of knee arthritis would undergo a total knee replacement surgery. Patellofemoral knee replacement is a minimally invasive surgical option that preserves the knee parts not damaged by arthritis as well as the stabilizing anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, ACL and PCL.

Robotic-Assisted Knee Replacement

Robotic-Assisted Knee Replacement

The knee is made up of the femur (thighbone), the tibia (shinbone), and patella (kneecap). The meniscus, the soft cartilage between the femur and tibia, serves as a cushion and helps absorb shock during motion. Arthritis (inflammation of the joints), injury, or other diseases of the joint can damage this protective layer of cartilage, causing extreme pain and difficulty in performing daily activities.

Hip

Hip Resurfacing

Total Hip Replacement

Arthritis is inflammation of the joints resulting in pain, swelling, stiffness and limited movement. Hip arthritis is a common cause of chronic hip pain and disability.

Minimally Invasive Approaches to the Hip

Minimally Invasive Approaches to the Hip

The hip joint is one of the body's largest weight-bearing joints and is the point where the thighbone (femur) and the pelvis (acetabulum) join. It is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the femur is the ball and the pelvic acetabulum forms the socket. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular cartilage that cushions and enables smooth movements of the joint.

Joint Replacement Education Class Handbook

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Dr. Paul Jacob
Oklahoma Joint
Reconstruction Institute

9800 Broadway Ext.
Suite 201
Oklahoma City, OK 73114

Dr. Gerardo Myrin
Oklahoma Joint
Reconstruction Institute

3115 SW 89th Street
Oklahoma City,
OK 73159